shayarisms4lovers June18 51 - 21 Of The Most Inspiring Quotes For Parents Raising Adopted Kids

21 Of The Most Inspiring Quotes For Parents Raising Adopted Kids

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Take these to heart.

If you’re in the adoption sphere, then you already know there are some major differences between parenting an adopted child and a biological child.

Learning about these differences often causes fear and insecurities in adoptive parents, but, as these brilliant parenting quotes and pieces of parenting advice from experts show, these fears have little to do with the differences between raising an adopted child or a biological kid.

In fact, the differences aren’t the issue at all. The issue lies in your ability as an adoptive parent to cope with them.

Here are 21 of the best parenting quotes and pieces of advice all adoptive parents should know:

1. Deal with your past.

“The best gift an adoptive couple can give their child is to work through their own issues of abandonment and loss [ … which] greatly affect[s] how they act and react in their relationship to their child.” — Nancy Verrier

From one of the best adoption books on the market, Nancy Verrier’s overarching message is that before you try to fix your child’s issues, you need to clean up your own past in order to be an effective parent.

2. Check your perspective.

“Problems are not problems. Coping is the problem.” — Virginia Satir

How we experience life is a matter of perspective. What we define as a problem is merely our inability to cope based on the meaning we have given to it. What one complains about, another rejoices in.

3. Learn your child’s love language.

“Love felt by the parent does not automatically translate into love experienced by the child.” — Dr. Gabor Maté

Recognize that either your or your child’s views of love could be skewed.

To some people, love means being protected and watched over — but to a kid, they could experience your protectiveness as being controlled. Or, perhaps your way of showing love is hugs, closeness, and bonding — but for a traumatized child, they could interpret these gestures oppositely and feel threatened instead.

4. Think beyond the more tangible aspects of raising a kid.

“There is a great deal more to preparing for an adopted child than fixing up a nursery or having money in the bank for a college education. There is a real need for emotional stability, honesty, and the willingness to become truly informed about what this process means for the adopting parents

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