15 Quotes To Help You Appreciate Your Parents When You Have To Move Back Home After College

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College life is over… welcome back home?

After spending four long (or maybe short) years at college having the time of your life, getting to do whatever you want and staying up late, reality hits you like a ton of bricks. Unless you were lucky enough to get a job immediately after you graduate, you’re most likely broke and have very little in the way of future prospects. With nowhere to go, you have to move back home…with your parents.

Cue the daily sighs.

It’s so deflating having to move back home. You have to go back to being stuck in one room instead of having a whole apartment or house to yourself. You can’t make food at two in the morning and you certainly aren’t going to be partying a whole lot anymore. Stripped of your freedom, you’re left to simply wait until you finally get the opportunity to leave.

If you can relate to this, you know exactly what I’m talking about. There are very few people who actually want to live with their parents once they’re an adult. And once you get a taste of being on your own, you never want to go back.

It can be a pretty less-than-ideal situation, but there are ways to make it better. You can try just having basic conversations with your parents about your day or offer to help around the house. Little things can help to keep the harmony at home, which is what you should aim for. Constantly fighting with your parents after moving back in isn’t going to help anyone.

Of course, things like that are sometimes easier said than done, especially if your home life was already rocky. If actions also aren’t really your thing, maybe try words. While going back home isn’t really ideal, a parent and their child should still do their best to have a functional relationship. So, here are the words of others with wise quotes about going home again after college that will hopefully help you cope with living at home again after college.

1. First, you never know when your parents will be gone.

“I’ve learned that regardless of your relationship with your parents, you’ll miss them when they’re gone from your life.” –Maya Angelou

2. We learn a lot from them, even when we’re older.

“Our parents can show us a lot of things: they can show us

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shayarisms4lovers June18 75 - Love at First Call

Love at First Call

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“You’re 25 now and still single. What a shame!”

“What is it you want in a man? You’ll get an old man if the right age surpasses. There won’t be any use of crying over spilt milk.”

“It’s a feminine issue, one shouldn’t be so careless.”

Khadija was immune to such comments. She was 25 and being single at this age in a Pakistani society was more like a sinful act for girls. It had been years since she had been listening creepy stuffs about her, but the good thing was, she had gotten immune to them all. Her family had been trying to set her up with someone for a few years, but she hadn’t gotten any luck yet. After experiencing three to four years of continuous torture, she was okay with what was happening around her and nothing bothered her anymore.

Well, that’s what is easier said than done! That’s what she told herself that she was okay and nothing disturbed her, but deep down, it was killing her. She felt herself draining in depression that made her ill-tempered and grumpy. She spent hours crying alone late at night and gave up on her situation. Being weak wasn’t an attribute of her personality. She was a strong and bold lady and she hated herself for being like that. “Nothing is more detestable than being unable to control your emotions.” She thought.

“He’s a good man with a good job and education. You asked for an educated man and he’s masters and doing PhD. What more do you wish for?” Khadija’s mom scolded her the 50th time for not agreeing to marry one of the guys in the family. She had demanded a well-educated man when her family asked her what type of guy she wanted to marry. That’s how conjugal things in a Pakistani family work. Her family had been trying to pursue her to marry that guy because he was “dekha bhala” (known in the family) and matched Khadija’s demands. But, she didn’t like him that way. In fact, she didn’t like him in anyway, but it was hard to explain it to her family members. Especially her parents wanted her to marry him because her dad feared to give her daughter to a man they didn’t know and her mom insisted because he belonged to her family. That’s how desi (Pakistani) parents are! But …

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shayarisms4lovers June18 51 - 21 Of The Most Inspiring Quotes For Parents Raising Adopted Kids

21 Of The Most Inspiring Quotes For Parents Raising Adopted Kids

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Take these to heart.

If you’re in the adoption sphere, then you already know there are some major differences between parenting an adopted child and a biological child.

Learning about these differences often causes fear and insecurities in adoptive parents, but, as these brilliant parenting quotes and pieces of parenting advice from experts show, these fears have little to do with the differences between raising an adopted child or a biological kid.

In fact, the differences aren’t the issue at all. The issue lies in your ability as an adoptive parent to cope with them.

Here are 21 of the best parenting quotes and pieces of advice all adoptive parents should know:

1. Deal with your past.

“The best gift an adoptive couple can give their child is to work through their own issues of abandonment and loss [ … which] greatly affect[s] how they act and react in their relationship to their child.” — Nancy Verrier

From one of the best adoption books on the market, Nancy Verrier’s overarching message is that before you try to fix your child’s issues, you need to clean up your own past in order to be an effective parent.

2. Check your perspective.

“Problems are not problems. Coping is the problem.” — Virginia Satir

How we experience life is a matter of perspective. What we define as a problem is merely our inability to cope based on the meaning we have given to it. What one complains about, another rejoices in.

3. Learn your child’s love language.

“Love felt by the parent does not automatically translate into love experienced by the child.” — Dr. Gabor Maté

Recognize that either your or your child’s views of love could be skewed.

To some people, love means being protected and watched over — but to a kid, they could experience your protectiveness as being controlled. Or, perhaps your way of showing love is hugs, closeness, and bonding — but for a traumatized child, they could interpret these gestures oppositely and feel threatened instead.

4. Think beyond the more tangible aspects of raising a kid.

“There is a great deal more to preparing for an adopted child than fixing up a nursery or having money in the bank for a college education. There is a real need for emotional stability, honesty, and the willingness to become truly informed about what this process means for the adopting parents

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shayarisms4lovers June18 252 - Family Picture

Family Picture

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By LC

After Slugg: A Boy’s Life in the Age of Mass Incarceration by Tony Lewis Jr.

There’s something missing with this picture
As I wake onto a random day
In a random hood
In a random city
In America
I listen
Listen to the voice of my mother
Shouting down the bickering of my
Little sister and little brother
But there’s something missing
So I look
Look to find my auntie on the couch
With my baby cousin in hand
Look out the window to find the neighborhood junkie
But he is not the MAN
I’m looking for
See that man has been gone for years
Gone from this family’s struggles
Gone from being this family’s muscle
Gone from this family’s daily hustle
Ironic that I used that last word
‘cause HUSTLE is what got him sentenced
To no return, L.I.F.E.
So my father is what’s missing with this picture
My uncle too
And to every other black child
In a random hood
In a random city
In America
I’m just like you too.…

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